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Learning

Mathematics

How much curriculum time is given to Maths in KS2?

Pupils have 6 hours of maths each week. They are taught in their mixed-ability tutor groups. At Edwinstree we teach maths using manipulatives, pictures, diagrams and abstract calculations through problem-solving and reasoning. Challenge Home Learning enables pupils to select key skills that need additional practise to work on at home.

What topics is my child covering in the Autumn Term?

Year 5 learn to:

  • Read, write, order and compare numbers to one million, understanding the value of each digit and being able to count forwards and back from any number in tens, hundreds, thousands, ten-thousands or hundred-thousands.
  • Interpret negative numbers in context and move along a number line crossing zero from positive to negative numbers and vice versa.
  • Round numbers up to one million to the nearest ten, hundred, thousand, ten-thousand or hundred-thousand.
  • Read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals.
  • Add and subtract numbers mentally with increasingly large numbers.
  • Add and subtract whole numbers with more than 4 digits, including using columnar addition and subtraction.
  • Use rounding to check answers to calculations and determine, within the context of a problem, the level of accuracy.
  • Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
  • Multiply and divide numbers mentally, drawing upon known facts.
  • Multiply and divide whole numbers by 10, 100 and 1000.
  • Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by one or two digit numbers using a formal written method, including long multiplication for 2 digit numbers.
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a one digit number using the formal written method of short division and interpret remainders appropriately for the context.
  • Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number and common factors of two numbers.
  • Recognise and use square and cube numbers and notations for squared and cubed.
  • Solve problems involving all of the skills and knowledge above, including the use of the equals sign.

Year 6 learn to:

  • Read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit.
  • Round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy.
  • Use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero.
  • Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above.
  • Solve addition and subtraction multi step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.
  • Multiply multi-digit number up to 4 digits by a 2 digit number using the formal written method of long multiplication.
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a 2 digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions or by rounding as appropriate for the context.
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a 2 digit number using the formal written method of short division, interpreting remainders according to context.
  • Perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers.
  • Identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers.
  • Use their knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations.
  • Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
  • Use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination.
  • Compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1
  • Generate and describe linear number sequences (with fractions)
  • Add and subtract fractions with different denominations and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions.
  • Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form [for example 1/ 4 x 1/ 2 = 1/ 8]
  • Divide proper fractions by whole numbers [for example 1/ 3 ÷ 2 = 1/ 6]
  • Associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents [for example, 0.375] for a simple fraction [for example 3/8]
  • Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts.

If you would like to support our work on place value, number and calculations the following activities and resources may be helpful:

  • The maths passports for Place Value and Number and Calculations include lots of useful tools and examples.
  • My Mini Maths website has Back to Basics calculations by year group along with themed calculations. TT38 helps with learning times-table facts.  There are 52 arithmetic papers here along with a tracking sheet to record progress.
  • BBC Bitesize have useful explanations and examples.
  • Youtube have some great videos by maths teachers on how to calculate using Base ten or Cuisenaire.
  • Power of 2 books and resources can be purchased from their website 123 Learning.
  • Play games that encourage exchanging ten items for one other, we like the Exchange Game.
  • Nice or Nasty? Is a dice game which supports the understanding of the value of each digit in large numbers.
  • Playing games, such as darts, Monopoly, Scrabble where scores must be calculated – pupils should do this mentally.
  • Topmarks website have some good problem-solving and reasoning questions.
  • Maths is Fun website has lots of different games to be played on the computer developing logic, number, calculations etc.

How much curriculum time is given to Maths in KS3?

  • Pupils in Y7 have 5 hours of maths each week. Pupils in Y8 have 4 hours each week. They are taught in their mixed-ability tutor groups. At Edwinstree we teach maths using manipulatives, pictures, diagrams and abstract calculations through problem-solving and reasoning. Challenge Home Learning enables pupils to select key skills that need additional practise to work on at home.
  • What topics is my child covering in the Autumn Term?

Year 7 learn to:

  • Understand and use place value for decimals, measures and integers of any size.
  • Order positive and negative integers, use the number line as a model for ordering of the real numbers; use the symbols     =, ≠, <, >, ≤, ≥ 
  • Round numbers and measures to an appropriate degree of accuracy [for example, to a number of decimal places or significant figures]
  • Use formal written methods for addition and subtraction of integers and decimals.
  • Recognise and use relationships between addition and subtraction including inverse operations.
  • Calculate and solve problems involving perimeter.
  • Multiply and divide by 10, 100 and 1000
  • Use formal written methods for multiplication and division of integers and decimals.
  • Recognise and use relationships between operations including inverse operations.
  • Understand the order of operations.
  • Use the concepts and vocabulary of prime numbers, factors (or divisors), common factors and highest common factor (HCF).
  • Use integer powers and associated real roots (square, cube and higher), recognise powers of 2, 3, 4, 5 and distinguish between exact representations of roots and their decimal approximations.
  • Find the prime factor decomposition of a number.
  • Calculate and solve problems involving area of rectangles, triangles and parallelograms.
  • Calculate the mean average.
  • Use approximation through rounding to estimate answers and calculate possible resulting errors expressed using inequality notation a<x≤b

Year 8 learn to:

Revise and improve:

  • Four operations
  • Order of operations
  • Negative numbers
  • Fractions
  • Algebra
  • Multiply and divide proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers both positive and negative:
    Fraction x Integer
    Fraction x Fraction
    Fraction ÷ Integer
    Integer ÷ Fraction
    Fraction ÷ Fraction
    All of the above proper, improper, mixed, positive and negative.
  • Find a fraction of an amount.
  • Find the whole amount, given a fraction of the amount.
  • Find a fractional increase and decrease.
  • Define percentage as ‘number of parts per hundred’, interpret percentages and percentage changes as a fraction or a decimal, interpret these multiplicatively, express one quantity as a percentage of another, compare two quantities using percentages, and work with percentages greater than 100%. This should include:
  • Define percentage as ‘number of parts per hundred’
  • Interpret diagrams as percentages and vice versa
  • Interpret percentages as a fraction or as a decimal
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another
  • Compare two quantities using percentages, and work with percentages greater than 100% E.g Claire got 16 out of 20 on a test, Simon got 21 out of 25 on a test.  Who got the better score?
  • Interpret percentages as operators, with and without a calculator.
  • Solve problems involving percentage change, including:  Percentage increase, decrease and original value problems and simple interest in financial mathematics.

If you would like to support our work on place value, number and calculations the following activities and resources may be helpful:

  • The maths passports for Place Value and Number, Calculations and Fractions, Decimals and Percentages include lots of useful tools and examples.
  • My Mini Maths website has Back to Basics calculations by year group along with themed calculations. TT38 helps with learning times-table facts.  There are 52 arithmetic papers here along with a tracking sheet to record progress.
  • BBC Bitesize have useful explanations and examples.
  • Youtube have some great videos by maths teachers on how to calculate using Base ten or Cuisenaire and how to represent multiplication and division of fractions using a pictorial method.
  • Power of 2 books and resources can be purchased from their website 123 Learning.
  • Play games that encourage exchanging ten items for one other, we like the Exchange Game.
  • Nice or Nasty? Is a dice game which supports the understanding of the value of each digit in large numbers.
  • Playing games, such as darts, Monopoly, Scrabble where scores must be calculated – pupils should do this mentally.
  • Topmarks website have some good problem-solving and reasoning questions.
  • Maths is Fun website has lots of different games to be played on the computer developing logic, number, calculations, fractions etc.
  • Dara O’Briain’s School of Hard Sums on Dave have some great mathematical problems – we like the Chocolate-Chilli Roulette – beware of occasional inappropriate language.